Student-made games: Future Transport 2017

The Future Transport Competition challenged student teams across Years 1-13 to design games or narratives about transforming transport.

Case studies of winners in newsletter

Newsletter 37 preview

Future Transport Competition case studies.

Student and teacher voice.

Read about the learning behind winners and highly commended.

Features Best Games... and Best Narratives.

Read it now (PDF, 5.4 MB)


Best Game Years 1-6

Game: Transport Hero

School: Clearview Primary School

Students: Ava, Grace and Hannah

From the students

Can you be a Transport Hero? Test some futuristic transport technology and save the world!

Direct the purple car by moving the mouse. Don't worry if your directions get crazy, this self-driving convertible is programmed to keep the passengers safe.

Transport Hero Scratch game and project (full instructions)

Judges' comments

Excellent work, team! You’ve made a digital game which puts transport and sustainability factors into the gameplay. The game has a simple concept and is really well-made. It’s fast-paced and really is heaps of fun to play. Good description of your research.

We really like how much you shared the game with your schoolmates. It is awesome to see people playing the game and enjoying it.

Best Game Years 7-10

Game: Starpath

School: Riccarton High School

Students: Kayley, Kaile and Georgia

From the students

The key message we are trying to get across to the people playing our game is that the Starpath is a safer way to travel while walking or cycling after dark, it also reduces demand for lights and electricity around paths.

We think that it would be helpful that people playing our game know about the Starpath and why it exists.

Judges' comments

We love this board game. We really wanted to play it! It’s a beautiful idea and a fresh one, with a focus on supporting safe walking.   The team were driven by curious questions and a top-notch design process.

You wrote excellent documentation and gave your game in-depth play-testing. These are both key skills in creating a game. Overall, this is a very impressive entry.

Best Game Years 11-13

Game: STOP

School: Westlake Girls High School

Students: Katherine, Regina, Dheyril and Raina

From the students

With 90% of New Zealanders expected to own a smartphone by 2018, distracted walking poses as a huge threat to the future of New Zealand transport.

It is an issue which we believe is incredibly prevalent around us and will get worse for the future. However, hardly any awareness is being created about "distracted walking".

We want the future transport of New Zealand to be first and foremost SAFE.

Play Stop online and read more from the students (student website)

Judges' comments

This is a game that works. It is fun and engaging. It stands out. What is really neat is how the game mechanic and the message match up well. It really did make you notice how distractions might continue to be an issue for pedestrians of the future.

You’ve provided clear evidence of design and testing while holding your focus on a relevant topic. Awesome work.


Highly commended games

Game: The Game of Future Transport

Year level: 1-6

School: Titirangi Primary School

Students: Amy, Sarah, and Iris

Judges' comments:

This board game explores several things that impact on future transport, from technology to behaviour. And it looks exciting.

Well done to the team for getting classmates from different year levels to test the game. You put an effective design process into action, using feedback to make changes. The result? A carefully-made game with revisions and a very thoughtful design. Keep it up!


Game: To the Future With It!

Year level: 1-6

School: Titirangi Primary School

Students: Nathan, Izayah, and Bo-Nan

Judges' comments:

This team's research and design thinking is very well done and well documented. We loved your beautifully board and the neat 3D printed pieces. In fact, the board itself looks like something truly new and unique. So, give yourselves a pat on the back for taking a creative risk.

Great to see how you playtested the game, taking notes on what worked and what didn't. You’ve clearly put lots of thought into the game rules.


Game: Energy Drive

Year level: 7-10

School: Diocesan School for Girls

Students: Brooke, Annabelle, and Kate

Judges' comments:

Gameplay is a standout feature of this game. You’ve made a creative decision to focus on energy collection and conservation instead of points or money as a measure. This lets players think about the impact of their choices and how this relates to real-world issues around future transport.

You’ve planned well. You’ve produced an excellent game. We’d love to sit down and have our turn playing it!


Game: Developing Technologies Showcase

Year level: 11-13

School: Westlake Boys' High School

Students: Alfred, Gautam, Tianren, and Zhelin

Judges's comments:

What an impressive concept! This team has used their future transport research to code a virtual museum environment with a built-in quiz component. Keep going with this – we would suggest more interaction in future versions.

That said, the effort involved in using Unreal Engine to create something of this magnitude is fantastic. Do keep developing your skills. Who knows what you’ll make next?


Commended entries

The Train Game by Riccarton High School students Shifa, Isabel, Amelie, and Charlotte (Years 7-10).

Judges: This board game has a great look, and the multi-stage aspect gives players a real sense of progress. Very nice product design and everything fits into a box. You’ve tested it with friends and responded to their feedback. We can see how the research played out in the game. Players would learn heaps, while having fun. Well done.

The Great Kiwi Race by Westmount School - East Coast Campus - Gisborne students Amber, Rhylan, Storme, and Barnes (Years 7-10).

Judges: What a huge effort from this team in designing and making a large-scale floor game to play. Using the whole of New Zealand as the play space is clever. The quality of all the pieces looks fantastic. The scenario is fascinating and there is evidence of smart research. We would love to have a turn playing so we could gain a clearer explanation of the game mechanics.